Joe is Ready to Ride

By this time next week, Joe Ostaszewski, founder of Wear Your Soul Foundation, will be setting off from Washington, DC, to go across America.

On His Bike.

Talk about Commitment!

two white men, red shirts, bikes, on sand

Henry and Joe Ostaszewski, co-founders of Wear Your Soul Foundation, made a commitment to change and now are preparing to ride across America.

Of course, he isn’t going to just ride his bike every day for the next two months. He’s going to talk to kids and their parents all along his route through Roanoke, Nashville, Oklahoma City, Albuquerque, Los Angeles, and a lot of smaller towns along the way, Continue reading

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Never Let Words have Power Over You

I heard from some readers after I wrote about the controversary of using either ‘the n-word’ or the actual word. Some were offended that I dared to say nigger,

wire frame glasses, high quality pen, resting on typewritten paper, copy illegible

Words can hurt, and when you let them, they fester and become your master. To free yourself from the power of those words over you, take back the power through repeated use, until you have reduced them to mere words on paper.

even when calling it an offensive word. Some agreed that using substitutions for the word creates further barriers.

More than one suggested that using it repeatedly takes the power away from the word as a pejorative, the way homosexuals adopted use of the word queer and made it their own. (Remember, the original meaning of queer was ‘strange,’ or ‘odd,’ and only later did it become a slur.) Continue reading

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Will You Choose Quality or Quantity at the End of Your Life?

It’s been 56 months since I placed an agonizing call to Iowa Hospice about my dad.

4 dice, 6, 3, 5, 5, brown cup on side, brown and black granite countertop

For most of us, how our life ends is just a roll of the dice. A lucky few can intentionally choose quality or quantity for the number of our days.

 

With that call, he, and all of us, his family, entered the last leg of a journey whose outcome had been set two years earlier.

In the time since a spinal stroke, Dad had become a great-grandfather, had seen Mom sell the house they had lived in for 42 years, had given his most prized possessions – his HAM radio gear – to his only grandson-in-law, and had spent roughly 20,000 hours in a hospital bed or wheel chair. Continue reading

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